Securing Financial Assistance After A Job Loss

Losing your job can be devastating. How will you support your family? How will you pay your bills? While unemployment compensation benefits will not be equal to your earnings while you were employed, they will provide you with some income to help you meet your financial obligations.

If you have been terminated by your employer through no fault of your own, you may be entitled to unemployment compensation benefits. To qualify for unemployment compensation benefits you must:

  • Be willing and able to work
  • Not be self-employed
  • Not be on strike
  • Not be guilty of misconduct while you were employed (for example, refusing to follow a company rule, showing a disregard for the employer's interests, or of the employee's duties and responsibilities)
  • Not have failed a drug or alcohol test

What If I Quit My Job?

You may still be eligible for unemployment compensation benefits if you quit your job. If you quit your job because you simply did not want to work for the employer anymore, you would be ineligible for benefits. However, if you quit your job due to a cause of necessitous and compelling nature you may be able to obtain benefits. A cause will be considered to be necessitous and compelling if, for example, the conditions at your previous job were unsafe; you had health concerns and your employer was unable or unwilling to accommodate your medical limitations; you had personal or transportation difficulties and despite your best efforts to maintain the employer/employee relationship, these personal considerations made it impossible to do so.

If you believe that you are eligible for unemployment compensation benefits, you should apply for benefits as soon as possible at your nearest unemployment compensation service center. There will be a one-week waiting period for eligible benefits after you apply. The sooner you apply, the sooner you may receive your benefits. After you apply and answer any questions raised by the Unemployment Compensation Service Center, you will receive a Notice of Determination, advising you as to whether your claim for benefits has been approved or denied.

Appealing Unemployment Claim Decisions

If either you or your previous employer is dissatisfied with the result of the Notice of Determination, either the employer or the employee has the right to appeal the determination. The appeal will be heard by an unemployment compensation referee. If either party is unhappy with the decision of the referee, the application may be appealed again to the Unemployment Compensation Board of Appeals, and even beyond that if necessary.

Helping clients throughout the Harrisburg, Pennsylvania area, the experienced attorneys at Tanner Law Offices, LLC, will help you navigate the often confusing and complex appellate process to help you receive the benefits that you may be entitled to receive. To discuss your unemployment compensation matter in detail, or to schedule a free consultation, contact or call a lawyer today at 717-836-0471.